Monday, March 2, 2015

Wyas to Enhance your Study Abroad





1)) Keep a scrapbook or journal. Although you may not realize during those few months, the precious times abroad, however vivid, will fade over time. Take some time out of your bsuy schedule to reflect on your day and jot down all the quriky details, whether it be the new word you learned or an observation you have! 

2) Toss out that grammar book in the back of your book, and talk to people!
Sometimes, we all get shy about talking to native speakers. However, what better opportunity to learn about a new language and culture? Not only does practicing the language give you a different perspective (as you’ll gain a level of respect),


3) Check out these apps designed especially for Study Abroad!
We live connected in this modern world, and now, you can enhance your experience using technology as well!


Need to find the nearest grocery store, mall, or bar? Where to Go? provides a very simple interface to find the resources nearest you.


Trip Journal
With this app, you’ll be able to save photos, online journal entries, and little snippets of your day onto a Google-map integrated platform, where your family and friends can visually see on Google Maps your route as well as the daily snippets you share of your travels!


Dragon Dictation
Siri, but for the dedicated traveler. Dragon Dictation allows you to speak into the the app and see your words translated into another language as well as post social media updates uor send reminders to yourself, all with your voice!  


Wi-Fi Finder
Ever wonder where the nearest wifi port is near you (both paid and free)? There is an app for that.
With these apps by your side, you'll be more preapred for your study abroad! So to end on a slightly more philosophical note, as Steve Jobs says, "You have to trust in something - your gut, destiny, life, karma,“ Sometimes, during study abroad, it’s best to go with your intuition and leave the planner and maps behind. Getting to know a culture is like getting to know a person; there’s no one roadmap to how you get there. So explore, and have fun!

Finding Language in Unconventional Places

Conceptual art is a term used to describe artwork that holds the idea (or concept) in greater esteem than the media used to create the work, or its aesthetic appearance. Installations and site-specific work are conceptual, as they do not conform to traditional notions of art. Rather than the idea being represented in the art (as in the case of a painting of a pipe for instance), the idea is the art.


Joseph Beuys, Felt Suit 1970

Felt suit and wood hanger

displayed: 1660 x 660 x 260 mm

ARTIST ROOMS Acquired jointly with the National Galleries of Scotland through The d'Offay Donation with assistance from the National Heritage Memorial Fund and the Art Fund 2008 DACS, 2009

The Conceptual Art Movement rose to prominence during the 1960s, and was championed by artists such as Joseph Kosuth, Sol LeWitt and Lawrence Weiner. Among non-traditional materials used, like bicycle wheels and chairs, was language.

Out of the Conceptual Art Movement was born the Art & Language Movement, in 1968. Terry Atkinson, David Bainbridge, Michael Baldwin and Harold Hurrell were the founding members of the group in England. For the most part, the movement was contained within the UK and the USA in the late 1960s and the early 1970s. This group of artists gave language and text a centralised role in their artwork. 

Incorporating language into art pushes the boundaries of what it means to create art. There is less of an emphasis on artistic skill than on the realisation of an idea, sometimes using found objects and cheap material. Evidently, to fully grasp the intention of the art, comprehension of the language used is necessary. This brings to light the question of accessibility of the art among non-English speakers and those without a formalised education. Although undoubtedly conceptual art today might employ languages other than English, in its initial stages, artists in the Art & and Language Movement primarily used English in their work. Indeed, consumers who cannot comprehend the meaning of the words can appreciate the visual or aural nature of the words for their own sakes. Visual art is not the only mode of presentation of art that incorporates language. Spoken and recorded text was and is used as another effective way to convey an idea. Language is a powerful tool, which can be found and used in the most unlikely places.



John Baldessari, I Will Not Make Any More Boring Art 1971
Lithograph, composition: 22 3/8 x 29 9/16" (56.8 x 75.1 cm); sheet: 22 7/16 x 30 1/16" (57 x 76.4 cm)



References
  1. http://www.tate.org.uk/learn/online-resources/glossary/c/conceptual-art
  2. http://www.tate.org.uk/learn/online-resources/glossary/a/art-and-language 
  3. http://www.moma.org/learn/moma_learning/themes/conceptual-art/language-and-art
  4. http://www.moma.org/learn/moma_learning/john-baldessari-i-will-not-make-any-more-boring-art-1971 
  5. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Art_%26_Language\
  6. http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdfplus/778941.pdf?acceptTC=true&jpdConfirm=true
  7. http://www.menzies.acadnet.ca/314/314%20Readings/Lewitt%20paragraphs%20sentences.pdf

Thursday, February 19, 2015

Cheaper Ways You CAN Travel the Globe!

Do you want to travel but feel like money is the main or only obstacle that is standing in your way?
There are several ways to travel abroad cheap--the most common are work-exchanges, hopitality-exchanges, home-exchanges, and volunteer programs. 

I'm going to show you that you can travel abroad, no matter what your budget.


1. WORK-EXCHANGES: 
Work-exchanges involve volunteer work in exchange for free acommodation and food (bed and board). Oftentimes, this can mean a homestay (staying, living, and eating with the host family) but depending on where you work/go, it could be an apartment, cabin, or elsewhere. These are usually the cheapest options since your help is greatly needed and appreciated so generally your hosts really want you there. These can last from as little as a week to a whole year, depending on what you and your host decide. Volunteers are usually expected to contribute around 20-25 hrs of work per week. It does mean spending part of your vacation working, but if you're interested in cultural travel and language exchange, traveling doesn't get much more local than literally living with a local family and sharing in their daily activities! Here are some popular options for work-exchange:

credit: http://workawayblog.com/wpblogworkaway/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/787680.jpg


HelpX-- "Online listing of host organic farms, non-organic farms, farmstays, homestays, ranches, lodges, B&Bs, backpackers hostels, and even sailing boats who invite volunteer helpers to stay with them short-exchange for food and acommodation." 
HelpX is probably the most commonly-known work-exchange site. You can make an account for free, but in order to contact hosts or be contacted, you have to upgrade to the premium membership which is 20 euros for 2 years. HelpX operates mainly in the USA, Canada, Europe, Australia, and New Zealand, but is also available in several places internationally. You are encouraged to travel with friend/s and can create your account as a "couple account" if you wish. (The more help the merrier!)
I haven't explored the HelpX site so I can't give a personal recommendation about this it, but I have read many good reviews about it.
http://www.helpx.net/

Workaway-- "A site set up to promote fair exchange between budget travellers, language learners or culture seekers and families, individuals or organizations who are looking for help with a range of varied and interesting activities."
Workawayers can search for hosts in exchange for providing the following types of work: gardening, building, babysitting/childcare, elderly care, cooking/shopping, general maintenance, farming, help with eco project, help in the house, animal care, helping with tourists, charity work, language-exchange, art project, help with computers/internet, teaching, etc. Like HelpX, you can make an account for free, but in order to contact hosts or be contacted, you have to register which costs 23 euros for 2 years. A couple account is also possible on this site.
Although it's a bit more expensive than HelpX, I personally prefer Workaway. The site is more visually pleasing, clear, and easy to navigate. There also are many more international hosts available and you're likely to find a host in the country you want that wants the kind of work you can and want to offer. You can also see photos of the place you're interested in and review feedback left by hosts and travelers.
http://www.workaway.info/

WWOOF-- "World Wide Opportunities on Organic Farms, or Willing Workers on Organic Farms, is a loose network of national organizations that facilitate placement of volunteers on organic farms."
They very well may have invented the work-exchange concept, since their organization began in the '70s. WWOOF, however, is focused on organic farming and is country-specific. So if you know you want to organic farm in Ireland, WWOOF is probably a great option for you. However, if you want to travel around and try many things, I wouldn't recommend this site. Country-specific means that each country has its own WWOOF organization, and you need to pay a membership fee for each one.
I have never used WWOOF but my sister and her fiance have used it on many occasions, since their primary interest is organic farming in the States. In their case, it is a very good option and works well for them.
http://www.wwoof.net/

*For these types of sites, beyond paying the registration fee for the site (which ensures that everyone on the site is serious and therefore ensures better hosts/workers), the only other fees you need to pay are any plane tickets or visas you need. In some cases, your host might reimburse you (depending on how long you intend to stay with them) or you may not need a visa. Generally, all other costs will be covered by your host though some spending money would be good to bring with you.


Here are some reviews comparing the above sites:

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2. HOSPITALITY-EXCHANGES: 
A hospitality exchange or home stay network is an organization that connects travelers with local residents in the cities they're visiting. They are similar to work-exchanges except that you're more of a guest than an employee/volunteer. They are accepting you more out of the good of their heart and out of the desire to learn your culture/language than because they need your presence. The pros of this is that you get a more home-y place to stay for very cheap (or potentially free, depending) and you don't have to endure hard-work to earn your stay. The cons of this is the lack of privacy and the reminder that you are a guest so you should probably present yourself a certain way. Hospitality-exchanges rely a lot on trust and an open heart. Here are some options for hospitality-exchange:


credit: http://i2.wp.com/charlieontravel.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/Nicholas-CS-family.jpg?resize=660%2C495

Couchsurfing-- "The website provides a platform for members to 'surf'on couches by staying as a guest at a host's home, host travelers, or join an event."
Couchsurfing is definitely the most commonly known hospitality-exchange. It's completely free to make an account, to message people, respond to people, and join groups. However, it costs $25 to verify your account. Verifying your account is not necessary but potential hosts are more likely to take you seriously since verifying shows that you are serious about your journeys. References will also show that you are a good guest and someone that would be worth hosting.
Couchsurfing is ideal if you are traveling around and need somewhere to sleep (like a couch) and want an alternative to hostels. Couchsurfing is usually expected to be short-term. Although hosts are not allowed to charge a fee on the Couchsurfing site, they do expect their guests to help out in some way--maybe cook, clean, or offer language-exchange. Since you're not working for your room and board, you might as well help out in some way.
Personally, I love the Couchsurfing site. You can be both a host and traveler in the same account, the site is visually appealing and easy to navigate, and if you're not up for traveling yet you can still use the site for language-exchange through messaging/Skype. Couchsurfing is a huge organization and you can certainly find many good/bad reviews of it on Google. 

https://www.couchsurfing.com/

HospitalityClub-- "The club is supported by volunteers who believe in one idea: by bringing travelers in touch with people in the place they visit, and by giving 'locals' a chance to meet people from other cultures we can increase intercultural understanding and strengthen the peace on our planet."
Hospitality Club's aim is to bring people together. Members around the world help each other when they are traveling-- be it with a roof for the night or a guided tour through town. Joining is free, takes just a minute, and everyone is welcome. Members can look at each other's profiles, send messages, and post comments about their experience on the website.
Although it's one of the most popular results that comes up when you search "hospitality-exchange" and I've seen many good reviews on it, I personally don't use Hospitality Club. I have an account but I find the site hard to navigate and not as organized so I prefer options like Couchsurfing and Workaway. 

BeWelcome-- "Step inside and invite travelers to your home, find hosts all over the world, and become part of our multicultural hospitality community. We are not-for-profit, open source, and exclusively run by members in a transparent and democratic way."
BeWelcome is a lot like HospitalityClub, it's a popular result on Google search and I've seen many reviews of it, but I personally don't use it. Apparently all membership and features are completely free and users can make comments on their experiences to warn others of good and bad experiences with hosts/guests. 

TrustRoots-- "Hospitality exchange community for hitchhikers and other travellers. We want a world that encourages trust, adventure, and intercultural connections."
TrustRoots is a very new organization/site but seems very down-to-earth and user-friendly. It is completely free to make an account and to contact others, after you confirm your e-mail/activate your account. Just like Couchsurfing, you can be both a host and traveler in the same account. TrustRoots seems to be geared mostly towards hitchhikers but is in no way limited to them--on the site they say they are working on expanding their community and want you (the users) to add your input/ideas/opinions/comments to help them grow. 

WarmShowers-- "A free worldwide hospitality exchange for touring cyclists. People who are willing to host touring cyclists sign up and provide their contact information, and may occasionally have someone stay with them and share great stories and a drink."
This is a very common result on Google searches but is obviously centered on traveling cyclists. You have to pick a membership level each year. You can choose the free trial membership which costs nothing, but donations are highly encouraged since it's a non-profit. Since I'm not a cyclist, I am not registered on this site nor have I explored it. There do seem to be plenty good reviews of it on Google though, so if you have a fondness for cycling, this site might be a wonderful option to look into!

*As with anything, please use your intuition and judgment when using these sites. Be safe and take precautions to make sure you are picking a good host. Look for hosts with good references/feedback and hosts that you can Skype-call beforehand to get to know and make sure you are making the right decision. These sites rely a lot on trust and the good nature of people, so be aware of that. 

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3. HOUSE-SITTING/HOME-EXCHANGE/HOME-SWAPPING: 
I've seen many names for these, but the primary idea is either you watch someone's home (and possibly pets) while they are on vacation, or the two of you switch homes for vacation. House-sitting is great because you get to travel to the location you want, but instead of living in a hostel or on someone's couch, you're living in a potentially beautiful house. Many home-owners will let you use their pool or anything else they have available (i.e. tennis courts, or possibly their car). Some home-owners will leave their pets at home while on vacation, and you will be expected to take care of them too. Home-swapping is an option I only recently came across. Instead of you just leaving your house to watch some other person's house, the two of you "swap" houses for your vacation. That way you both get to travel and explore the location of your choice, while your house is being taken care of/watched over. Obviously, a lot of trust and respect is involved in these options. Here are some options for this type of exchange:


credit: http://prague.tv/images/articles/home-exchange-czech-590x.jpg


HomeExchange-- "Travel anywhere, like a local, stay for free. Our members use their homes to save thousands when they travel. Join today and browse 5500+ home exchange and house swap listings in 150+ countries."
Apparently the world's #1 international home-exchange site. It's $150/year, but there is a 14-day free trial period that allows you to everything a paid membership would allow you to do. They include this guarantee, "If you don't do an exchange in your first year, you get a second year free!" So despite the large fee, it does seem to be a well-trusted site that is easy to navigate (and find help). There is a 24/7 live chat available and the site includes homes that are pet-friendly, so instead of leaving your pets at home, you can go on vacation with them.
This site has an "exchange agreement" that they recommend both families sign (like a contract) to ensure clear communications and avoidance of any misunderstandings. This is a home-exchange site, so you are expected to open your house to the family of the house you want to vacation to. Therefore, along with messaging homes/families you're interested in, you are to advertise your own home too, and there is a lot of information on the site on how to do that successfully.
https://www.homeexchange.com/en/

HomeForExchange-- "Home for exchange is a marketplace for non-commercial home exchange. You stay in their home while they stay in yours."
There is a 10-day free trial, after that your membership will continue on an annual basis and you will be charged $65 for the first year. (For two years it's $100, and for three years it's $130). It's probably one of the cheapest options and has many good reviews. You can browse listings before making an account.
http://www.homeforexchange.com/index2.php

HomeLink-- "As the world's original home exchange organization, we offer a huge variety of home swap homes in over 80 countries around the world and the USA. Our organization has pioneered the global experience of home exchange vacations."
There are three membership options: 1-year (115 euros), 2-year (195 euros), and 3-year (265 euros). Like HomeExchange, they have guarantee that if you don't find an exchange in the first year, they will give you a second year free. You can browse homes before becoming a member.
http://usa.homelink.org/en/

Stay4Free-- "Home exchange is when two families agree to exchange homes for a period of time for vacation. There is no time limit: it could be for a weekend or 12 months. There is no place limit either: the exchange can be within a country or between different countries. A key characteristic is that nobody pays anything; your stay will be free."
There is a 14-day free trial then you can choose a standard membership ($12/month), plus membership ($14/month) or pro membership ($35/month), the bigger the membership, the better the rewards. However, the pro membership looks the best to me and seems to be the most popular. The pro/plus memberships also provide the guarantee (that if you don't find an exchange the first year they'll renew your membership for a whole year, free of charge). As a non-member you can search for listings.
https://www.stay4free.com/

MindMyHouse-- "We've provided all the tools for home owners and house sitters to find each other from around the globe (or around the corner). And it works!"
Home owners join for free. House sitter memberships are the cheapest on the web at only $20/year. This site also provides a house-sitting agreement that both parties should sign and review. This site seems to be mostly centered towards home owners, as you can search for house sitters before making an account (but not for home owners). Although the listings seem to be limited, apparently many housesitters start with this site (probably because it's the cheapest) and have good reviews of it. (Note: this is not a home-exchange; this is someone traveling and you staying in their house while they are gone. So this is actually a really great option if you don't exactly have a home to exchange but need somewhere to live anyway). 
http://www.mindmyhouse.com/

TrustedHousesitters-- "We connect home and pet owners who need a sitter with trustworthy people who want to house sit; reliable pet lovers and experienced home minders who are willing to live in your home and look after it and your pets while you're away (usually for free)."
This site is very well-known and therefore has many good reviews. Depending on whether you're a homeowner or housesitter, you choose a different membership. Both versions have the annual plan available. Annual plan is $96/year. Or you can choose the combined plan (which allows both a homeowner and homesitter membership) which is the same price as the annual plan and is therefore the best value. On this site, before membership, you can search both housesitters and homes to sit. It's a very pet-friendly site, assuming that most of its members have pets or are good with pets. 
http://www.trustedhousesitters.com/us/

*Although most of these sites seem to require a pricey membership, in the long run it is definitely cheaper than most experiences vacationing abroad. After the membership fee, you just have to pay for flights, food, and spending money, but you don't have to rent/buy the house you live in. So you basically get the opportunity to live somewhere gorgeous in the country of your choosing without buying or renting it. Definitely a unique opportunity if you decide to do it.


Here are some useful sites:

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4. VOLUNTEER PROGRAMS:
Volunteer programs are a nice way to vacation to your dream destination while also doing something to help the world around you. Most volunteer programs cost at least a couple hundred dollars, but considering everything that's included in the package, it's a pretty sweet deal and can be a great option if you want a meaningful vacation. The International Volunter Programs Association (IVPA) answers the common question of "Why pay to volunteer?": Most of the programs that offer international volunteer opportunities charge volunteers a fee in order to cover their year-round coordinating and operational costs. Many also need to raise funds to contribue materials and other resources to the overseas project. By volunteering abroad, you are making a commitment to fundraising. (There are some free volunteer programs but they are few and far between).

credit: http://www.goeco.org/media/1277/304_2919.jpg

Idealist-- "We connect idealists with opportunities for action."
Idealist is a site that has jobs, internships, and volunteer programs around the world listed. It's basically like a Google for great travel opportunities.
http://www.idealist.org/

GoEco-- "Created by experienced volunteers for people who are eager to travel and contribute to the community, wildlife, and environement they visit. Based on years of practice and in-depth field reports, GoEco presents you with a careful selection of excellent yet affordable volunteer and ecological minded vacations."
Basically, if you like animals and/or conservation, I'd really recommend you take a look at this site. There are also several non-animal-related opportunities on this site (like teaching, childcare, and community work). Most of the programs cost from $450-$2000 but they are all-inclusive, covering your board/room, food, training, wifi, and sightseeing opportunities. The price depends on how long you intend to stay.
http://www.goeco.org/

FreeVolunteering--
It's exactly what it sounds like: a site that lists free volunteer programs/opportunities around the globe. You can search by location. Each one lists the stay duration expected, how many hours you are expected to devote, what they pay for, and what you need to pay for (usually you are expected to cover your own flight, internal transport, travel health insurance, pocket money, visa, etc). They also include requirements. Most require you to be at least 18 and some might require a bachelor's degree.
http://www.freevolunteering.net/

OneWorld365-- "Ignite your wanderlust by searching our unique trips and volunteer opportunities in over 100 worldwide destinations."
Similar to GoEco except there are many non-animal projects. They list volunteer programs, jobs, and other interesting opportunities.
http://www.oneworld365.org/

Cultural Homestay International-- "CHI is a non-profit educational organization that promotes international understanding and goodwill through people-to-people exchanges."
Although this site also has some USA internships and an international Au Pair program, I've included it on this list because of their ECVA program. The ECVA (English Conversation Volunteers Abroad) program lets you live with a host family, with full room and board, for 1-3 months. In exchange for that, you just have to share your native language with your hosts for 15 hours/week. (They also ensure plenty of free time so that you can explore the country you're staying in). No prior teaching experience is necessary! These casual English conversation lessons usually run 5 days/week, 3 hours/day. CHI provides you with tutoring materials, but most of our hosts that are learning English as a second language (ESL) simply want to practice speaking English with a native speaker. It's that fun and easy!
The program cost depends on where you choose to go and how long you intend to stay (staying longer is actually cheaper in this case). For example, Japan is $23/day whereas Vietnam is $10/day. You can earn college credit. The only requirements are you have to be at least 18 years old, be a native speaker of English (or completely fluent), and be a high school graduate (though some college is preferred). The ECVA program runs year long so you choose your departure date.
http://chinet.org/english-conversation-volunteers-abroad/

Here are some useful sites:

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There are several more options and opportunities all across the internet, and more are cropping up every day. I'm sure if you are determined, you'll find the perfect opportunity for you to travel in a economical way. 

You can always, of course, look into scholarships and grants to help pay for your travels (if you can prove that they're destinations/programs that will help you and others). Or you can try to get yourself funded with Indiegogo or Kickstarter (if you're good at fundraising). 

The sky is the limit! Just remember--if you want to travel you can!


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More Helpful Articles-
http://theplanetd.com/how-to-find-free-accommodation-around-the-world/
http://www.theguardian.com/travel/2015/feb/10/why-id-rather-take-a-free-couchsurfer-than-make-money-from-airbnb
http://www.theguardian.com/travel/2011/jul/15/best-travel-websites

Helpful sites-
http://www.smartertravel.com/
http://www.transitionsabroad.com/index.shtml

Thursday, November 6, 2014

LLPC: Chinese

One of the best ways to learn a language is through incorporating it into your daily life, and a seamless way to incorporate it in is through finding TV shows, songs, and movies in that language. Here at the LRC, we embrace various ways of learning languages, and so we have created a blog series called Learning Languages through Pop Culture (LLPC) dedicated to helping you learn languages through popular culture!



TV & Movies

Office Girls- This Taiwanese hit drama follows a group of 'office girls' - young women who are completely happy with being a low-level office lady
Prince of Lan Ling - A historical drama that follows a celebrated prince known for his victories on the battlefield
Hayate the Combat Butler- A Taiwanese reverse Cinderella story


Triple Tap
When financier Ken Yao (Louis Koo) stumbles upon a plot to kill a police officer, he takes action into his own hands.

All these TV shows can be viewed at dramafever.com

Music


LLPC: Spanish Version

One of the best ways to learn a language is through incorporating it into your daily life, and a seamless way to incorporate it in is through finding TV shows, songs, and movies in that language. Here at the LRC, we embrace various ways of learning languages, and so we have created a blog series called Learning Languages through Pop Culture (LLPC) dedicated to helping you learn languages through popular culture!


TV

Violetta - A Spanish musical tv series about a talented girl who moves back to Buenos Aires after living abroad for several years and discovers her talent at a music school.
Aurora - After her body was frozen for 20 years, Aurora+ wakes up to find her life completely changed. 
The Time in Between-The life of a seamstress during the Spanish Cviil war, from rising to fame to her service to the British Secret Service.
All these TV shows can be viewed at  http://www.dramafever.com
:
Some other great resources for Spanish news are:

Yabla Spanish ( https://spanish.yabla.com/) Yabla has dozens of Spanish TV, documentaries, sitcoms, and sports news catered towards learning the language. It offers a one-of-a-kind interface that allows you to look up the definitions of the words in the  subtitles by clicking on them onscreen.


Music

Knowing that there are numerous amounts of musical styles and artists, one of the best ways to gain exposure into the world of music in different languages is through radio shows and podcasts. Here are a few of the more popular ones: